TIFF14: And the People's Choice Award Goes To......

GROSLCH PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD                                                                                          

There were a number of extraordinary films at this year's Toronto International Film festival but there was one that was a clear front runner from the minute anyone laid eyes on it at early press screenings. This year marked the 37th year that Toronto audiences were able to cast a ballot for their favorite Festival film, with the Grolsch  People’s Choice Award. This year’s award goes to Morten Tyldum for The Imitation Game. Benedict Cumberbatch stars as Alan Turing, the genius British mathematician, logician, cryptologist and computer scientist who led the charge to crack the German Enigma Code that helped the Allies win WWII. Turing went on to assist with the development of computers at the University of Manchester after the war, but was prosecuted by the UK government in 1952 for homosexual acts which the country deemed illegal.  The award offers a $15,000 cash prize and custom award, sponsored by Grolsch.

 

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The first runner up is Isabel Coixet’s Learning to Drive. The second  runner up is Theodore Melfi’s St. Vincent starring Bill Murray and Melissa McCarthy. 

 WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS STARRING JEMAINE CLEMENT

WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS STARRING JEMAINE CLEMENT

The Grolsch People’s Choice Midnight Madness Award goes to Taika Waititi and Jemaine Clement for What We Do in the  Shadows. The film follows three flatmates who are just trying to get by and overcome life’s obstacles — like being immortal vampires who must feast on human blood. First runner up is Kevin Smith for Tusk and the second runner up is Jalmari Helander for Big Game.   The Grolsch People’s Choice Documentary Award goes to Hajooj Kuka for Beats of the Antonov. Beats of the Antonov follows  refugees from the Blue Nile and Nuba Mountains in Sudan as they survive displacement and the trauma of civil war. Music, a cornerstone of their traditions and identity, becomes itself a vehicle for survival. First runner up is David Thorpe’s Do I Sound Gay? The second runner up is Ethan Hawke’s Seymour: An Introduction.